10 – 12

Africa

Activity

Africa

What to do with this activity?

Africa is huge! It's the second biggest continent, after Asia. Check out a map of the earth and see how small Ireland and Europe are compared to Africa.

There are over 50 different countries in Africa, and around 2,000 different languages are spoken. The very first human beings lived in Africa. The population of Africa is 1,225,240,943 as of Tuesday, October 25, 2016, based on the latest United Nations estimates. As well as human beings, there are an amazing number of different species of wild life living in climates from desert to tropical forest, and everything in between.

There's an awful lot to learn about Africa - its peoples, cultures, religions, landscapes and politics. Perhaps there are children in your child's school whose parents come from Africa, or perhaps your own family has an African background? Start by learning something about countries you or your friends have heard something about. 

Find some more interesting information about Africa from Ducksters here and read a little about some individual countries on the Activity Village website here. For an interactive map of African countries click here. There is a printable map of African countries if you scroll down on the Ducksters link. 

  • Why am I doing this?

    It’s important to encourage whatever reading your child is doing at this age. Children have their own interests and hobbies so they will be more inclined to read information about these subjects. Having comics, papers or magazines around the house will make it easier for your child to get into reading. Your child might find it appealing to read online and you might like that the book can be read by an automated voice. E books can be looked at when you are on the move, making sure that your child is careful with your computer or phone.

  • How can I do more?

    Your child might like to read a section of the newspaper or a magazine – the sports, fashion or cooking sections - depending on their interests. They might like to read a short piece from a newspaper and underline facts with a pen and opinion with a pencil. You can then talk about the difference between fact and opinion (there are good examples in sports writing). Encourage your child to read instructions for mending bikes, building models and playing new games.

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